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ulfric-ulfprick:

godotal:

hkirkh:

Confused husky pup

He’s not expressing confusion, he’s tilting his head for better sound localization. While having an ear on each side of the head is good for lateral echolocation, tilting the head so that the ears are offset gives it vertical depth.

doG SCIENCE

ulfric-ulfprick:

godotal:

hkirkh:

Confused husky pup

He’s not expressing confusion, he’s tilting his head for better sound localization. While having an ear on each side of the head is good for lateral echolocation, tilting the head so that the ears are offset gives it vertical depth.

doG SCIENCE

(via kittensandscience)

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skunkbear:

americasgreatoutdoors:

This bear is in Lake Clark National Park, a land of stunning beauty where volcanoes steam, salmon run, bears forage, craggy mountains reflect in shimmering turquoise lakes, and local people and culture still depend on the land and water of their home. Photo: Kevin Dietrich (www.sharetheexperience.org)

Don’t leave him hanging.

skunkbear:

americasgreatoutdoors:

This bear is in Lake Clark National Park, a land of stunning beauty where volcanoes steam, salmon run, bears forage, craggy mountains reflect in shimmering turquoise lakes, and local people and culture still depend on the land and water of their home.

Photo: Kevin Dietrich (www.sharetheexperience.org)

Don’t leave him hanging.

Photoset

thecraftychemist:

Scale of the universe

Scroll to your hearts content from the Planck length to the diameter of the observable universe - click on any object and it will open an info box - I can’t imagine how much work must have gone into this. A few surprising things: Pluto has a smaller diameter than the width of the USA and Vatican city can fit in central park multiple times.

Find it here

(via badsciencejokes)

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zerostatereflex:

GE Advanced Materials Testing

"When we know how materials melt, shatter and bend, we can make machines that don’t."

Nice. :D

(via badsciencejokes)

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earthstory:

Strong Earthquake north of San Francisco BayIn the early hours this morning, a magnitude 6 earthquake struck in the area of Napa Valley, California. The exact earthquake strength estimates will likely be refined throughout the day as data is processed, but this is the largest earthquake to strike the Bay Area since the 1989 Loma Prieta quake.The quake struck near a fault that produced a damaging magnitude 5 quake a little over a decade ago and in the area near the West Napa Fault and the Rodgers fault, but it reportedly took place on a different strand of one of those faults. The USGS is currently working to identify exactly which fault broke in this quake.The damage to the area will be significant, although hopefully the loss of life will be minimal. The type of geology in this area exerts a strong control on how intense the shaking is; the earthquake took place in a valley likely filled with loosely-packed sediment, a setup that tends to intensify shaking. Those sediments are separated from the rocks that make the nearby hills and so there is less energy transferred to those areas. If you look at this USGS Shakemap, you can see this effect quite clearly – the valley itself got a strong shake, but the intensity drops in the higher ground. Napa and surrounding cities sit within these valleys, so there is likely to be heavy damage to older or unreinforced brick buildings. It’s night right now, but early images seem to confirm that.When there is an earthquake like this, big enough to do damage but not catastrophic, it’s a good time to remember earthquake preparation. In the event of a quake, get yourself under a strong table and get outside once it is over. Have a preparedness kit ready. Know how to get in touch with your family members – text messages are often the best these days because they don’t tie up phone lines. And perhaps the biggest from my perspective; have a supply of fresh water available for your family; when a large quake happens, that is the one item everyone needs and if the water-transport infrastructure is damaged, it’s the one item no one will have.-JBBImage credit:http://earthquake.usgs.gov/earthquakes/eventpage/nc72282711#shakemapRead more:http://www.decodedscience.com/m6-1-earthquake-napa-valley-shakes-san-francisco-24-august-2014/48886http://abcnews.go.com/US/northern-california-struck-60-magnitude-earthquake/story?id=25101008http://t.co/yrcblCdW1H

earthstory:

Strong Earthquake north of San Francisco Bay

In the early hours this morning, a magnitude 6 earthquake struck in the area of Napa Valley, California. The exact earthquake strength estimates will likely be refined throughout the day as data is processed, but this is the largest earthquake to strike the Bay Area since the 1989 Loma Prieta quake.

The quake struck near a fault that produced a damaging magnitude 5 quake a little over a decade ago and in the area near the West Napa Fault and the Rodgers fault, but it reportedly took place on a different strand of one of those faults. The USGS is currently working to identify exactly which fault broke in this quake.

The damage to the area will be significant, although hopefully the loss of life will be minimal. The type of geology in this area exerts a strong control on how intense the shaking is; the earthquake took place in a valley likely filled with loosely-packed sediment, a setup that tends to intensify shaking. Those sediments are separated from the rocks that make the nearby hills and so there is less energy transferred to those areas. 

If you look at this USGS Shakemap, you can see this effect quite clearly – the valley itself got a strong shake, but the intensity drops in the higher ground. Napa and surrounding cities sit within these valleys, so there is likely to be heavy damage to older or unreinforced brick buildings. It’s night right now, but early images seem to confirm that.

When there is an earthquake like this, big enough to do damage but not catastrophic, it’s a good time to remember earthquake preparation. In the event of a quake, get yourself under a strong table and get outside once it is over. Have a preparedness kit ready. Know how to get in touch with your family members – text messages are often the best these days because they don’t tie up phone lines. And perhaps the biggest from my perspective; have a supply of fresh water available for your family; when a large quake happens, that is the one item everyone needs and if the water-transport infrastructure is damaged, it’s the one item no one will have.

-JBB

Image credit:http://earthquake.usgs.gov/earthquakes/eventpage/nc72282711#shakemap

Read more:
http://www.decodedscience.com/m6-1-earthquake-napa-valley-shakes-san-francisco-24-august-2014/48886
http://abcnews.go.com/US/northern-california-struck-60-magnitude-earthquake/story?id=25101008
http://t.co/yrcblCdW1H

Photo
earthstory:

Canopy Forests of Coast RedwoodsThe redwood forests are among the most magical on the planet. The coast redwood (Sequoia sempervirens) occurs naturally along the pacific coast of North America from Oregon to northern Califoria. These coastal forests are situated among the “fog belt”, where cool precipitation and fog move from the ocean towards the coast at night. The fog supplies the trees with a constant water source, and blocks out some of the evaporative rays of the sun, reducing water lost via transpiration. These coastal redwood forests are often referred to as the Temperate Rainforest. What makes these trees so special? Well, aside from being one of the tallest organisms on the planet (380ft, or ~115m tall), their crowns acts as fractal forests. The canopies of redwoods were once thought to be ecological deserts, nothing more than redwood leaves and branches. But Marie Antoine, Steve Sillett, and Marwood Harris, old growth botanists, and expert tree climbers took the task of climbing one of these skyscrapers to explore the redwood canopy. And what they found was quite different from an ecological desert, but rather a fractal forest, full of epiphytes, trees, and numerous animals. Redwoods have a unique habit known as reiteration: where horizontal branches hundreds of feet off the ground will sprout vertical branches that act as new trees. Some of these reiterated tree sprouts are taller than the largest trees on the east coast. When leaves fall from the redwood canopy, they build up on the lower branches and ultimately form a “canopy soil” that supports other trees and bushes such as, tanbark oak, douglas fir, elderberry, and huckleberry. These sky forests are surprisingly diverse, supporting not only reiterated redwoods, but other dominant species like firs and oaks. This diversity attracts a litany of rodents, birds (songbirds and raptors), amphibians, and insects. These trees, thought to be 2500 years old (some possibly as old as 3-5,000 years), operate at a scale different from humans, almost a geologic timescale, where gardens grown in their canopy take 700-1000 years to form. Between 1970 and 1990 about 96% of the redwood forests were cut down in the United States, but the remaining 4% is now under government protection. As an ecologist I would revel in the opportunity to meet and study these special trees while so few remain. -Greg AegisFurther Reading- http://www.ecology.info/redwood.htm- http://tracker777.tripod.com/ecology.htmlBeautifully described by Richard Preston-www.ted.com/talks/richard_preston_on_the_giant_trees.htmlPhoto Credit-programmingthenation.com

earthstory:

Canopy Forests of Coast Redwoods

The redwood forests are among the most magical on the planet. The coast redwood (Sequoia sempervirens) occurs naturally along the pacific coast of North America from Oregon to northern Califoria. These coastal forests are situated among the “fog belt”, where cool precipitation and fog move from the ocean towards the coast at night. The fog supplies the trees with a constant water source, and blocks out some of the evaporative rays of the sun, reducing water lost via transpiration. These coastal redwood forests are often referred to as the Temperate Rainforest. 

What makes these trees so special? Well, aside from being one of the tallest organisms on the planet (380ft, or ~115m tall), their crowns acts as fractal forests. The canopies of redwoods were once thought to be ecological deserts, nothing more than redwood leaves and branches. But Marie Antoine, Steve Sillett, and Marwood Harris, old growth botanists, and expert tree climbers took the task of climbing one of these skyscrapers to explore the redwood canopy. And what they found was quite different from an ecological desert, but rather a fractal forest, full of epiphytes, trees, and numerous animals. Redwoods have a unique habit known as reiteration: where horizontal branches hundreds of feet off the ground will sprout vertical branches that act as new trees. Some of these reiterated tree sprouts are taller than the largest trees on the east coast. When leaves fall from the redwood canopy, they build up on the lower branches and ultimately form a “canopy soil” that supports other trees and bushes such as, tanbark oak, douglas fir, elderberry, and huckleberry. These sky forests are surprisingly diverse, supporting not only reiterated redwoods, but other dominant species like firs and oaks. This diversity attracts a litany of rodents, birds (songbirds and raptors), amphibians, and insects. 

These trees, thought to be 2500 years old (some possibly as old as 3-5,000 years), operate at a scale different from humans, almost a geologic timescale, where gardens grown in their canopy take 700-1000 years to form. Between 1970 and 1990 about 96% of the redwood forests were cut down in the United States, but the remaining 4% is now under government protection. As an ecologist I would revel in the opportunity to meet and study these special trees while so few remain. 

-Greg Aegis

Further Reading

http://www.ecology.info/redwood.htm
http://tracker777.tripod.com/ecology.html

Beautifully described by Richard Preston
-www.ted.com/talks/richard_preston_on_the_giant_trees.html

Photo Credit
-programmingthenation.com

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(Source: mentalflossr, via mineralia)

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(Source: ancestralhaze, via asapscience)

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sadghoulzclub:

"their"

(Source: mcguirkthejerk, via mjolkk)

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jtotheizzoe:

The Far Future of the Universe

It’s natural to wonder what the future has in store for us. While we may not be able to predict what will happen to us tomorrow, science has made some pretty strong predictions about what will happen to the universe in the eons to come.

From the rearrangement of the constellations and meteorite impacts to the evaporation of our oceans and the stars themselves going out, there’s a lot of stuff to (not) look forward to.

Sure, the universe might not have a happy ending, but that just makes today more special, doesn’t it? Plus, BLACK HOLES.

Watch the latest It’s Okay To Be Smart (below) and I’ll tell you all about it!

(via itsfullofstars)

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Quote
"

I’ve never been female. But I have been black my whole life. I can perhaps offer some insight from that perspective. There are many similar social issues related to access to equal opportunity that we find in the black community, as well as the community of women in a white male dominate society…

When I look at — throughout my life — I’ve known that I wanted to do astrophysics since I was 9 years old…I got to see how the world around me reacted to my expressions of these ambitions. All I can say is, the fact that I wanted to be a scientist, an astrophysicist was hands down the path of most resistance through the forces of society.

Anytime I expressed this interest, teachers would say, ‘Oh, don’t you wanna be an athlete?’ I want to become someone that was outside of the paradigm of expectations of the people in power. Fortunately, my depth of interest of the universe was so deep and so fuel enriched that everyone of these curve balls that I was thrown, and fences built in front of me, and hills that I had to climb, I just reach for more fuel, and I just kept going.

Now, here I am, one of the most visible scientists in the land, and I wanna look behind me and say, ‘Where are the others who might have been this,’ and they’re not there! …I happened to survive and others did not simply because of forces of society that prevented it at every turn. At every turn.

…My life experience tells me that when you don’t find blacks, when you don’t find women in the sciences, I know that these forces are real, and I had to survive them in order to get where I am today.

So before we start talking about genetic differences, you gotta come up with a system where there’s equal opportunity, then we can have that conversation.

"

Neil DeGrasse Tyson in response to a question posed by Lawrence Summers, former Treasury Security and Harvard University President

"What’s up with chicks and science?"

Are there genetic differences between men and women, explain why more men are in science.

(via magnius159)

(via women-in-science)

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gravitationalbeauty:

Pin by Anna Elizabeth Nelson on Illustrate
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